Online Now 471

BOL Round Table

The No. 1 'Bama fan community on the Internet

Online now 1866
Record: 9097 (3/2/2012)

Boards ▾

BOL Round Table

The No. 1 'Bama fan community on the Internet

The Water Cooler

BOL message board for off-topic posts

The Tailgate

Tailgating, recipes, cooking, food & drink

Ticket Exchange

Buy, sell or swap tickets

Reply

Gus and AU better hope...

  • DrPacino said... (original post)

    Just do what the NFL does. Their refs call a much better game and it's because they are rarely if ever out of position.

    That, and the fact that NFL referees are working games as their full time job. They are paid accordingly and thus are required to meet a higher set of standards and held accountable. Those guys put in significant hours on film study, game review, individual training, etc. Most college referees are basically part time, contract employees with other full time jobs (salesmen, managers, business owners, etc.) They receive film post game and review it, but there is no way anybody can expect them to put in the hours necessary to be at the level of NFL referees. The bottom line answer to this problem is that until the NCAA takes over the officiating/referee managerial duties and pays them accordingly they are going to continue to make critical mistakes with very minimal repercussions...

    This post was edited by Nc016 3 months ago

  • Chris Walsh

    I agree that the college game will have to follow some of the examples of the pro game when it comes to officiating, but even at that level the average number of offensive plays per game has increased each of the past five seasons. However, each of the five highest averages since the AFL-NFL merger came before 1988, when the average was just under 133 plays per game.

    Avg offensive plays per game,
    past 5 seasons
    Season Plays
    2012 128.4
    2011 127.2
    2010 126.2
    2009 125.9
    2008 123.8

    signature image signature image

    Christopher Walsh covers Alabama football for BamaOnline, 247Sports, and is the author of 18 books.

  • Chris Walsh

    Also, from football zebras (this is about NFL officials) …

    The casual observer may think the officials only spot the ball, make sure the down box is correct, count players, and wait until the next snap. Not so. After the play is dead the referee, after making sure there is no foul, determines the next down, makes sure the ball is properly spotted, monitors offensiveStopwatch substitutes and makes sure the offense doesn’t break the huddle with 12 players, counts offensive players, announces if any players report eligible, finds his key, and monitors the quarterback for attempting to draw the defense offside. The umpire counts players, spots the ball, notes the correct position of the ball between the hashes, checks the down, notes the eligible receivers, checks the formation, picks up his key, and watches for false starts. The head linesman assists the referee in determining if the line to gain is reached, beckons the down box to move to the new spot and announces the next down, beckons the chains to move on a first down, monitors substitutions, counts offensive players, notes eligible receivers, checks the offense for proper formation, answers any questions the head coach has, attempts to placate an irate coach, clears the sideline, and watches for defensive offside or a false start. The line judge has the same duties as the head linesman except he has no chain responsibility. He is responsible for the back-up down box on his side. The deep officials are responsible for monitoring substitutions, counting defense players, and identifying their key. The back judge is also responsible for the play-clock and is responsible to make sure it is set properly. All officials are responsible to make sure that the game clock is correct and running properly.

    signature image signature image

    Christopher Walsh covers Alabama football for BamaOnline, 247Sports, and is the author of 18 books.

  • chefrossi said... (original post)

    expect we will see an emphasis on blocking down field and lineman down field on pass plays. also, should expect to see the refs slow the game down enough for the chains to be set before a play begins.

    rtr

    You mean like the B1G refs did last night standing over the ball which drove the Barn sideline crazy?

  • Tide2477 said... (original post)

    That's interesting. Didn't realize the NFL has an additional ref.

    One of the Bama fans sitting around me in New Orleans was screaming and adament that Oklahoma should have been flagged 4-5 times for snapping the ball before their own players were set. I don't know what the rule is there about how long they have to be set.

    I do swear I remember seeing at least two plays where Oklahoma had two guys in motion at the same time which I thought was a penalty but I guess not.

    The guy who marks the football in the NFL most times now is the new guy who is opposite the head ref and i have seen that said guy running to his spot after placing the ball in many Patriot games. I say the pats because they are the main team who can really go fast and snap it fast.

    I think the main thing is to make sure refs are allowed to set before the snap. It would help to add a Ref.. the pac12 started doing it this year in some games to experiment and i think it would be better but adding one person is not gonna allow the refs to be set if they are over the ball before the ref even places the ball.

  • Why can't you just put an additional referee in the booth whose sole responsibility is to monitor offensive alignment and motion?

    signature image signature image signature image

    15 National Championships, 23 SEC Championships, NCAA Record 60 Postseason Bowl Appearances, NCAA Record 35 Bowl Victories

  • Chris Walsh said... (original post)

    Also, from football zebras (this is about NFL officials) …

    The casual observer may think the officials only spot the ball, make sure the down box is correct, count players, and wait until the next snap. Not so. After the play is dead the referee, after making sure there is no foul, determines the next down, makes sure the ball is properly spotted, monitors offensiveStopwatch substitutes and makes sure the offense doesn’t break the huddle with 12 players, counts offensive players, announces if any players report eligible, finds his key, and monitors the quarterback for attempting to draw the defense offside. The umpire counts players, spots the ball, notes the correct position of the ball between the hashes, checks the down, notes the eligible receivers, checks the formation, picks up his key, and watches for false starts. The head linesman assists the referee in determining if the line to gain is reached, beckons the down box to move to the new spot and announces the next down, beckons the chains to move on a first down, monitors substitutions, counts offensive players, notes eligible receivers, checks the offense for proper formation, answers any questions the head coach has, attempts to placate an irate coach, clears the sideline, and watches for defensive offside or a false start. The line judge has the same duties as the head linesman except he has no chain responsibility. He is responsible for the back-up down box on his side. The deep officials are responsible for monitoring substitutions, counting defense players, and identifying their key. The back judge is also responsible for the play-clock and is responsible to make sure it is set properly. All officials are responsible to make sure that the game clock is correct and running properly.

    I'm not exactly sure of what their possible placement could be, but if you could add maybe 2-3 more refs and cut those responsibilities for each ref by say 1/3 i think the game would be officiated much more accurately from a procedural standpoint. I know it costs money, but that's part of running a multi-billion dollar industry, and that's exactly what college football has become. Like I've already stated in this thread, I am a fan of old school hard nosed football, but I do not think it is fare to change the rules of the game just so the refs can keep up. They're just going to have to get more refs and get the calls right.

  • if you noticed in the fsu game, the key was stopping them on first down. They then run a slower paced offense. Id be all about slowing them down, at least allo defense to sub if desired

    signature image

    --------------

  • I don't like this HUNH stuff but if you can stop them on first down then they get out of their element. Also, use your timeouts on defense when they get on a roll to regroup and get your correct personnel in. This drives them crazy as well.

    The problem to me is the HUNH eliminates defensive strategy which makes football a unique sport. It's the only sport I can think of where there is a specific time period set to strategize on both sides of the ball at every play interval. The object of HUNH is to eliminate the defense's ability to strategize. The game is losing it's class with all this scoring and running up and down the field it looks like basketball and the scores are starting to look like basketball scores as well. Hopefully something is done about it before all the purity is out of the sport.

    signature image signature image signature image
  • More timeouts or allowing the defense to substitute on every play (except for maybe the last 5 minutes of each half).

  • I was at the Sugar Bowl. Oklahoma was the fastest I have seen. The refs did a great job slowing to allow a substitute if the other team substituted. If there was no sub they seemed to move even quicker with the faster pace. Interesting to watch.

  • chickenandbeer said... (original post)

    I was at the Sugar Bowl. Oklahoma was the fastest I have seen. The refs did a great job slowing to allow a substitute if the other team substituted. If there was no sub they seemed to move even quicker with the faster pace. Interesting to watch.

    I agree, they had their plays scripted for the first few drives.

    Fastest moving NHHU team I've seen.

  • Great post. I love threads like this, that make you really analyze and think about the awesome game we adore so much. There is nothing I hate seeing more than that sweatervest wearing pompous gum chewing choir boy look a like walker texas ranger talking a-hole drawing an imaginary circle on the sidelines trying to catch the defense off guard.

    What I know about football, is only what Ive seen on television in my 25 year life. I played football for 2 weeks when I was 8, but quit because my helmet hurt my head. I did however, play baseball all the way up until Hartselle knocked us out of the state high school playoffs in 2006. I then went to bama where I played Rugby for a short time, just because I wanted to hit someone. Having said all that, baseball is all I know, I relate baseball to most things I have a hard time understanding.

    Having said all that nonsense, my view of the HUNH offense is like a pitcher not letting the umpire or batter get adequately positioned in the batters box before he throws the ball, and using trickery and haste to beat your opponent rather that talent, skill, and competitiveness. Thoughts?

  • What about maybe 3 additional TO's per game that are only 15 seconds or so without going to TV timeouts. Should only be eligible to call them when on defense. Not 3 per half, 3 per game...

    I understand playing within the rules and all, but if you can't get lined up, what's the point?

    Only down side is hurting the original intent of the rules. Get a first down with 5 seconds left, you gotta be able to run up and spike it.

    signature image signature image signature image
  • RT4Bama said... (original post)

    The boogs even snapped the ball one time with the umpire standing over the center. You would think that would have been a penalty but I guess not.

    Agreed. Should have been a delay of game. Also the booing and the coaches bitching moaning when an injury occurs is bush league. Some of them might be fake but a lot are legit.

  • This post is for members of BamaOnLine only. Join now! 30-Day Free Trial

    "I really believe, in my lifetime, that this is the best dynasty that I've ever seen in college football." - @KirkHerbstreit 1/8/13

  • Can't criticize any team for playing to their own advantage as long as it's done within the rules of the game. For many years now the rules have gradually evolved to the benefit of the offense. Now 80-100 point games aren't really unusual anymore.

    There was a time when it was illegal for an offensive player to use his hands; holding was a 15-yard penalty instead of the 10 yards it is now; ineligible receivers were not allowed downfield on a pass, even if it was completed behind the LOS, Now, if an offensive player lowers his head and it results in helmet to helmet , they flag the DEFENSIVE player. Ball carriers grab a tackler's face mask violently, but even an incidental contact with an offensive player's face mask will bring a flag. Defensive backs are scarcely allowed to defend passes anymore. It seems they throw flags at defenders for just not being polite to a quarterback!

    Offenses have always had the natural advantages of setting tempo and planning precisely the coming play. Receivers have the natural advantage of knowing the routes they are running. Offenses are given adequate time (40 seconds from the finish of the last play now as opposed to 25 seconds from the time the ball is signaled ready for play). As one poster above aptly described it, the HUNH is designed to eliminate defensive strategy. As it's being administered now, offenses are allowed to run so fast that often even the officials are not in position, and miss ineligible receivers downfield and illegal motion penalties.

    This isn't a balanced game anymore.

    signature image signature image signature image
  • Spoke to a former Bama player that referees in the SEC. The Big 12 added an extra ref this past season to see if if helped. We talked specifically about the "illegal" play AU runs and why it was missed. Said the refs just miss things sometimes based on the speed of the game. Thinks that in the off- season this will be a point of emphasis. Called an A&M game and said Sumlin was continually on him about placing the ball ready for play.

  • Hopefully Saban/Smart will utilize what Prewitt/Fisher did last night. Run a base D and let the players make plays. Also keying on stopping that 1st down, once that happened they had trouble getting into rhythm.

    One thing I would like to see is instead of subbing each play, platooning when we face HUNH. 1st series is a group of guys, 2nd series is a different set. 3rd series is a mix of the 2. Rotating. That way the guys are fresher.

    NCAA needs to put the official that lines up in the defense on the offense side of the ball.

    signature image
  • The pace of the game is definitely hurting officiating. They can't keep up

  • Tusks2 said... (original post)

    The problem to me is the HUNH eliminates defensive strategy which makes football a unique sport. It's the only sport I can think of where there is a specific time period set to strategize on both sides of the ball at every play interval. The object of HUNH is to eliminate the defense's ability to strategize. The game is losing it's class with all this scoring and running up and down the field it looks like basketball and the scores are starting to look like basketball scores as well. Hopefully something is done about it before all the purity is out of the sport.

    Great observation here. I'm not sure what the solution is, but it seems the deck has become stacked too much in favor of offenses now.