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Notebook: Kirkpatrick arrested

Days after declaring himself eligible for the NFL Draft, former University of Alabama cornerback Dre Kirkpatrick was arrested in Florida for marijuana possession.

Kirkpatrick was arrested by the Manatee County Sherriff’s Department (Bradenton area) shortly after midnight Tuesday morning and discharged after paying a $120 bond.

He was arrested along with former Alabama cornerback Chris Rogers.

According to the police report, they were arrested in Rogers' rented truck, after being pulled over for driving on the wrong side of the road. A dog detected the presence of drugs, and an officer found less than 20 grams of marijuana on the floorboard of the passenger side at Kirkpatrick’s feet.

Rogers told police he purchased the marijuana at a house and was charged with a drug offense. Kirkpatrick said he was in the car when the purchase was being made, but didn’t realize at the time what was being bought.

Krikpatrick was a two-year starter and made 30 tackles this season, with four tackles for a loss, nine breakups and two forced fumbles. He was named a first-team All-American by the Football Writers Association of America and was a finalist for the Thorpe Award for defensive back of the year.

He’s being tabbed as a potential top-10 draft pick, although the arrest might obviously affect his draft stock.

Smelley to play in Senior Bowl

Senior tight end Brad Smelley announced on Twitter that he’ll be playing in the Senior Bowl in Mobile: “I get to represent Bama one last time, just received and accepted an invite to the Senior Bowl! See y'all in Mobile, Roll Tide!”

He’s expected to join Mark Barron, Marquis Maze, DeQuan Menzie, Courtney Upshaw and William Vlachos. Nose tackle Josh Chapman declined due to having knee surgery.

Smelley finished second in Alabama receiving with 34 catches for 356 yards and four touchdowns. He also had the most receptions, seven for 39 yards, in the BCS National Championship Game.

The Senior Bowl will be played Jan. 28 at Ladd-Peebles Stadium.

Too tough?

ESPN’s Ryan McGee has tabbed Alabama as the team most in danger of losing early ground next season due to its schedule and not because of the national championship rematch (of the rematch) at Baton Rouge.

"You need to pay attention to the fact that two of the Crimson Tide's first three games include a trip to Arlington, Texas, to play the Michigan Wolverines and a visit to Fayetteville to play the Arkansas Razorbacks, who will have Tyler Wilson back under center,” he wrote. “I don't care who you are, that's tough."

However, he added that if Alabama can get through that it might have a “choke-hold” on No. 1.

Early NFL Combine list

According to CBS.com, the initial invitation list for the NFL Combine includes five Alabama players: Wide receiver Marquis Maze, nose tackle Josh Chapman, linebacker Courtney Upshaw, cornerback DeQuan Menzie, and safety Mark Barron.

Maze injured his hamstring in the national title game and Chapman will be coming off knee surgery.

The list does not include underclassmen, who had until Sunday to petition the NFL for early entry into the draft.

The official invitation list is expected to be announced by the end of the month. The Combine will be Feb. 22-28 in Indianapolis.

  • Mxylplyx said... (original post)

    I would hope you make the exact same argument for alcohol, or is that different because you've drank it and personally know what it's affects are? For every one smoker you know that fits your neat, media driven stereotype of what a smoker is, there are 10 more that fly completely under the radar because they use it responsibly.

    My ex was a casual, supposedly responsible user when we married. We had children before his addiction to it surfaced. He started as a casual, "responsible" user but evolved into an addict who couldn't function without being high. He couldn't keep a job because of his addiction, so we moved a lot. It was tough on our children who had to start over in new towns and new schools far more than they should have. I think most pot smokers believe they're being responsible. My ex still thinks he's a responsible pot smoker. He doesn't recognize what he has become, because it's me who had the problem, not him. I was a "*itch" who never wanted to "have fun". He wouldn't get help, even when we begged him to. He still doesn't think he's an addict. Smoking a bowl with friends when you're twenty can easily become not being able to enjoy a visit with your son whom you haven't seen in months without getting high in your bathroom first.

    How many of you pot smokers want your children to smoke, too? How many of you get high on family vacations? How about for your kids' school plays? School concerts? Graduations? How about your daughter's wedding? Ask yourself if that's the example you want to set for your children and if those are the memories you want to give them... and if you think that's the kind of parent children can be proud of. I promise you, it isn't. Every day of my life I wish for a "do-over", so my children could've grown up without that stress and unhappiness in their lives.

    I don't think many college-age casual, "responsible" pot-smokers ever dream they will turn into a middle-aged, pathetic addict. I'm sure twenty-somethings who spend every weekend at the downtown bars never dream they'll become alcoholics either. A lot of them won't, but some of them will.

    My stereotype, as you refer to it, didn't come from the media. I was married to him for 28 years. I know exactly what addiction looks like.

  • Listen to her guys she knows what she is talking about thanks bamajan thought I was alone on this. sorry chris will be my last post on this topic

  • BamaJan said... (original post)

    My ex was a casual, supposedly responsible user when we married. We had children before his addiction to it surfaced. He started as a casual, "responsible" user but evolved into an addict who couldn't function without being high. He couldn't keep a job because of his addiction, so we moved a lot. It was tough on our children who had to start over in new towns and new schools far more than they should have. I think most pot smokers believe they're being responsible. My ex still thinks he's a responsible pot smoker. He doesn't recognize what he has become, because it's me who had the problem, not him. I was a "*itch" who never wanted to "have fun". He wouldn't get help, even when we begged him to. He still doesn't think he's an addict. Smoking a bowl with friends when you're twenty can easily become not being able to enjoy a visit with your son whom you haven't seen in months without getting high in your bathroom first.

    How many of you pot smokers want your children to smoke, too? How many of you get high on family vacations? How about for your kids' school plays? School concerts? Graduations? How about your daughter's wedding? Ask yourself if that's the example you want to set for your children and if those are the memories you want to give them... and if you think that's the kind of parent children can be proud of. I promise you, it isn't. Every day of my life I wish for a "do-over", so my children could've grown up without that stress and unhappiness in their lives.

    I don't think many college-age casual, "responsible" pot-smokers ever dream they will turn into a middle-aged, pathetic addict. I'm sure twenty-somethings who spend every weekend at the downtown bars never dream they'll become alcoholics either. A lot of them won't, but some of them will.

    My stereotype, as you refer to it, didn't come from the media. I was married to him for 28 years. I know exactly what addiction looks like.

    I can sympathize with your wanting to blame his ills on weed, but that's like blaming a lazy person's lack of motivation on his couch. My sister just got divorced because her husband was addicted to porn. Countless people are addicted to alcohol. Do we ban those, and everything else a person might have a propensity to abuse? If your husband didn't discover weed, he would have found something else, likely something much more destructive given the alternatives.

  • You're mistaken. I don't blame his ills on weed. He is completely responsible for the damage he has done. If it wasn't weed, it would've likely been alcohol. After he was busted for possession, he was drug tested every week for six months. During that time, he drank to make himself ten feet tall and bulletproof. I just don't think people should pretend that marijuana isn't addictive. It is. I don't think even one person who becomes an addict believes it could happen to them when they first start smoking.

    My problem is with those who act like pot is no big deal and that it isn't addictive.

  • Crimson Duck said... (original post)

    Listen to her guys she knows what she is talking about thanks bamajan thought I was alone on this. sorry chris will be my last post on this topic

    It's hard for people to understand how damaging it is if they haven't experienced it themselves.

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